All posts by alecbennett95

Authentic

Does authenticity exist in social media? Probably not would be my answer, we all glamorise our social media profiles in some way or another. I’m not saying that it is bad that social media is unauthentic but rather trying to draw that people need to be aware of the truth behind what people post. Exaggerating on social media by portraying this perfect persona of our life through filtered lenses is the same as celebrities who look beautiful but have actually spent millions on plastic surgery, except for us theres no surgery, instead strategic lighting, angles and filters.

Have you heard of the social media application called BEME ? Bebe is an application that was launched in 2015 that promises to free people from the snobbery behind what they post. Authenticity is in short supply online, says application founder and creator Casey Neistat with social media forcing us to present over-stylized and over-perfect versions of ourselves to world. Bebe is an app where the user can only record and post video when the front of their phone screens are covered up, the suggested ways for this are to press the front of the phone to your head or chest so that a 4 second clip can record your surroundings and post it automatically without you being able to edit or filter.

Here’s Kevin Spacey talking about Beme

I tested out the app and it honestly felt a little weird, it even felt a bit invasive as i posted videos without having any control over them. I did find it interesting watching other peoples posts as it was like I was living in their shoes momentarily. It was nice though when posting to not have to worry about filtering or planning the image.

However I don’t necessarily think that Beme, although is achieving to create an authentic social media app is actually succeeding, because we can still choose when and what we post. Like I could only Beme when i’m doing excersise, or run for 2 minutes and post it to Beme without actuating running? Social media isn’t authentic, but are we as humans actually authentic? We all act differently when we’re around certain people, I’m probably more “authentic” around my family as I feel more comfortable around them, however I might try to be more happy, fun or interesting if I’m around new friends or people I’ve never met before. Social media is just another part of how humans want other humans to perceive them. It’s way we talk, dress, act and now thanks to social media what we post that helps others define who we are. I make sure my instagram feed makes me look like a happy, fun, adventurous not because I want to falsify who I am but because I want my followers to enjoy the photos I post.

tell the truth

We all know that digital media has become embedded in our everyday lives, and have changed the way we engage in communication, creative expression and how we produce knowledge. I plan to argue that instagram and other social media’s are negatively effecting our identity construction, especially in young people, under 25.

Rachel Brathen, a “instagram celebrity,” shared in a TEDx talk in 2015 that she slowly became famous on instagram from posting photos about yoga, health, food and happiness. However when she posted a photo of tequila with the hashtag “long day” her follower slammed her for being a hypocrite.It gave her the realisation that she wasn’t being completely honest with her followers. It is one of the dangers of social media, what we share and orchestrate our lives to be is what people actually believe to be true, not everyone see’s through the filters of social media.

Tell the truth. What is the truth? Social media is so often used to construct the idealistic online lifestyle. Adolescents in 2016 are having their identity influenced or even are finding it through social media. An identity isn’t something we are born with but is rather a socially constructed attribute. Who we are isn’t only determined by internal factors but also external, this is where social media comes into affect. Social media has become an extension of our identity formation. Part of identity formation is thinking about the type of person we want to be and social media allows for people, especially adolescents, to use this constant flow of information, photographs, videos, celebrities to be a guide for their own social comparison. Ideas and values that teenagers are developing of the world through social media aren’t always necessarily how the real world actually works. Likes don’t actually correlate to the future success of a young person.

Instagram Snobbery – Identity in Social Media

After meeting someone do you ever go online to see what their social media profiles say about the person? When did we become so judgemental about people purely based on the basic things they post on social media. Can we really learn about a person from what they post on instagram? We identify ourselves through what we post and what we are communicating to others about our lives. Below are some cool statistics about teenagers and their use of social media. The most important social network to teenagers appears to be Instagram. The way i look at instagram as it being the king of “fakery” or the most staged form of social media. Facebook is a place for communication, watching videos and posting lots of photos. Snapchat is the almost #nofilter zone where people care less about how much they post and what they’re doing, its like the “no-makeup” zone of social media. Twitter is not overly popular with young people, its mainly used to share useless thoughts, ranting, winging and stalking celebrities. Instagram however is King of snobbery, where people are so planned and purposeful about what they post. It’s almost strategic, whether it be posting at a time of day to get more likes, posting only well edited and aesthetic pictures, staging a fake “caught in the moment” shot, adding useless hashtags to get more likes. If there was a social media that could cause anxiety it would be Instagram. Instagram is also more popular with younger people because their parents don’t have it, parents somewhere in the last 5 years took over Facebook so teens turn to Instagram and Snapchat to hide away from the “oldies.”

The art of Instagram.

meeker-681-620x466
Humans are dependent on affirmation from others, the way we deem ourselves important or valued no longer comes from how many people we hang out with but how many likes and comments we get on our instagram. Below is a really sad truth video about how dependent we have become on sharing our entire life on social media and how it has consumed our lives and became the source of our identity.
Sunshine coasts Essena O’Neil has become a very influential voice behind the fact that social media isn’t actually real life. She has made a blog, edited all of her over thought, planned instagram photos as a almost expose on the world of a instagram celebrity. Heres an example of one of her edited Instagram captions. 
  • “EDIT REAL CAPTION: paid for this photo. If you find yourself looking at “Instagram girls” and wishing your life was there’s… Realise you only see what they want. If they tag a company 99% of the time it’s paid. Nothing is wrong with supporting brands you love (for example I proudly would promote Eco sheets or a vegan meal in exchange for money as its business for a purpose to me). BUT this ^^^ this has no purpose. No purpose in a forced smile, tiny clothes and being paid to look pretty. We are a generation told to consume and consume, with no thought of where it all comes from and where it all goes.”

 

essena4
She is the perfect example of how social media effects how we see ourselves, our individuality, how we express ourselves. At the end of the day we aren’t receiving any real physical likability or love its all come through the double tap of someones thumb.

Identity in Social Media

Young people in modern Australia no longer perceive popularity based on how many actual friends they have but instead seek affirmation and accomplishment from statistics of a high followers list. Generation Y grew up with internet being a normal part of every day life, from crappy nokia phones with snake to high powered iPhones we have watched technology rapidly advance. Generation I (the current generation) don’t actually know what the world was like before social media, iPhones and wi-fi. When we get bored of the current ‘real’ world we live in we turn to our mobile phones and immediately find a false alternate reality in our social media apps. Instagram isn’t just a feed of photos it has its own culture of people living to impress, prove something, communicate something. “It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens” – Danah Boyd looks at teenagers quality of lives being affected by social media. How the current world we live in paternalism and protectionism haven’t allowed young people to become informed, thoughtful and engaged citizens through their online interactions. Instagram users have shared over 30 billion photos to date, and now share an average of 70 million photos per day.

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 5.28.31 PM

A podcast I watched by Judah Smith titled “Instagram Isn’t Real” talks about how our Instagram isn’t actually real life, its a highlight real of our lives where we only display what we want others to see. When did we begin to link our understanding of identity with a piece of technology. We have understanding of self, through some online coded data and numbers that don’t actually mean anything in this world.

For my cybercultures research project I will be looking at how modern people find their identity through social media, specifically looking at Instagram and young people. I want to understand more about how cyberculture looks at human interaction with technology and how we have become online citizens that depend on social media to gain an understanding of self.  A case study I will look at will be Essena O’Neill and her expose on “Instagram isn’t real.”

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 5.24.45 PM.png

References

Boyd, Danah. It’s Complicated. Print.

Gauntlett, David. Media, Gender, And Identity. London: Routledge, 2002. Print.

LePage, Evan. “A Long List Of Instagram Statistics And Facts That Prove Its Importance”. Hootsuite Social Media Management. N.p., 2015. Web. 31 Mar. 2016.

Saul, Heather. “The Instagram Star Who Quit The Internet Is Now One Of Most Influential People Online”. The Independent. N.p., 2016. Web. 31 Mar. 2016.

Mandiberg, M 2012, The Social Media Reader, NYU Press, New York.