Category Archives: Cybertheory

NEW IDEAS! EXCITED! (BETA)

 

Screenshots of feedback outside class:

FEEDBACKScreen Shot 2019-03-29 at 9.06.20 pm

Ijumaa_is

My project is called ‘Growth.’ It is an EP that considers the future in 10 – 20 years’ time. I hope to influence the cycle of negative energy that we are currently digesting. The world needs to learn to love and compromise rather than destroy. I have researched the history of performance in Ancient Greece and how music frequency can be engineered to create calm and peacefulness. It is my hope that through the combined effort of my performance, message and frequency that you are all inspired to live and impact positively however you can. I love you all beautiful souls!

WORKING PROTOTYPE!!!

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Pitch Comments

Ijumaa_is

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I don’t have a link to this comment because it is awating moderation and won’t show up normally. Jessica’s Pitch was about the future of online media, through short videos she wants to educate us on the current state of online media, and the overall space of online media in terms of content creation and trends.

My comment set out to ask her how she could veiw her own place in the space of online media and asking how could she mould the future of the online world. As a filmaker/Youtuber I gave a few tips about making her informative videos engaging.

I think my comment was applicable and considerate towards her interests, suggesting another level of perspective into her work (through the lense of the self). Through inviting Jessica to consider how she may edit her videos, I am expressing a desire to see her do well and make…

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Critical analysis of live tweets

 

Critical analysis of live tweets

 

https://twitter.com/Ijumaa_is

I have enjoyed engaging with the BCM325 hashtag and having conversations that get me to think about the future and the current implications of technology. Following are some of those interactions and Tweets that most resonated with my fellow BCM325 classmates. It only seems logical to start with Metropolis!

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This Tweet was one of my more intelligent ones. I feel a little sense of achievement when I get re-tweeted, it is a sure way of knowing if something you said truly resonated with someone or impressed them. To me this was an interesting way to perceive the scene, I think in this example I engaged with the movie thoughtfully and intellectually.

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Unfortunately, my comment did not develop into a conversation. Travis made an interesting point which stood out to me, because at the time I was in that realm of thought. I wanted to add some relate some real-world knowledge to his literal statement about what was occurring in the movie, adding another layer.

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Over the few movies we have watched there are several comedic moments. The trajectory of my tweets in every viewing starts off serious and then at some point will branch off into a sort of unrelated conversation that stems from something about the movie. I think it’s nice to engage with people in a more light-hearted manner sometimes, you don’t always have to get deep and dark and philosophical.

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I am very proud of this Tweet, there were few moments in the movie where I had a perception that was this deep. I really appreciated the two re-tweets as it made me feel validation in what I was saying, the feeling that some understood. Again, I believe this was a moment of true engagement with the movie and the minds of others.

https://twitter.com/Ijumaa_is/status/1103421503314354177

I have provided a link for this tweet as the thread is too big to screenshot. It is another light-hearted post making a meme of a scene. I enjoyed the comment section on this tweet because it got a few humorous contributions and a large amount of like (well from what I am used to anyway). I noticed through experimenting with styles of tweets that humour is a great way to encourage engagement with what you have said, I can only hope to learn how to craft punchy tweets, could it be an artistic endeavour?

Moving on we arrive at 2001: A Space Odyssey

https://twitter.com/FAMOUSGEORGIE_/status/1105953430344851456

This is another example of a conversation that branched off from the topic of the film but stemmed from it. I still think that it was a good engagement, Georgie related her post to food and we related based on how hungry we were.

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Another post that was re-tweeted! I was glad to see how many people liked the score!

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Westworld.

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This Tweet stuck out to me because it was a smart perspective that invited engagement with a question. So, I decided to flesh out his perspective.

Blade Runner:

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Simply to show my engagement. Humorous.

 

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Another retweet, this was a great point and I respected it.

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https://twitter.com/ItsJoshCrawley/status/1111018532752375814

Overall, I think I have engaged to the best of my current abilities, however, I hope to improve!

Ghost In The Shell:

A cool conversation spawned from this tweet. We discussed programming in the context of human lives and to what extent are we programmed.

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I retweeted Chris’ post because I resonated with Motoko’s refusal to be defined by her shell. It got me thinking about how as humans we are also defined by our shell, and the need/want to transcend our ridgid definitions is a very human problem, yet we were seeing this in a cyborg, very interesting.

 

The politics and ideologies of data visualisation: A sociological perspective

Cybercultural Research Project: Second Progress Report

Since my first progress account I have renamed my topic, The politics and ideologies of data visualisation: A sociological perspective. The following is an updated outline that will guide the production of a research report or digital artefact.

Introductory Remarks

I will employ data visualisation to mean ‘the visual representation of statistical and other types of numeric and non‑numeric data through the use of static or interactive pictures and graphics.’  For now, I will define cyberculture simply and according to Mirriam Webster. I will also distinguish data from information in order to lay groundwork for the introduction of emergent critical perspectives associated with the politics and ideologies of data visualisation (abbrev. dataviz). For example, the ideological work that data visualisations do introduces dataviz conventions as functioning to produce a sense of ‘objectivity, transparency and facticity.’  In reality, graphics may be value-laden, ambiguous and fictitious (See also: Seeing Data 2016).  The introductory paragraphs will also note broad relevance of the topic, defining the concepts of information saturation (or overload), ‘data explosion’ and data science.

A sociologist in training, I will overview abstracts and biographies of a recent sociological conference to underscore the progress of Sociology in recent years, as these have been significant guides in my research. I will cite Healy and Moody’s view of Sociology as lagging in the use of visual tools.  This research will note the historical association of social work with the development and implementation of national policy circa the welfare state in 1946 to present. The Australian Commonwealth has exercised control over the direction of national social policy since the founding of the Commonwealth Research Bureau in 1944 (Morning Bulletin 1947). The privatization of social services will be raised as a related issue of concern in neoliberal contexts like Australia.

The four arguments introduced in my first progress report will be summarized for my audience and continue to guide topic development.

Research Body

Accordingly, I will exemplify how both past inventions and futuristic thinking have shaped the development of data visualisation technologies and practices. Examples of what science fiction has technologically foreseen will be provided in reference to a presentation by Jeffrey Heer titled A Brief History of Data Visualization.  This source will be coupled with a Milestones Tour to provide an overview of current DV trends and research areas. Augmented reality (AR) will be exemplified, envisioned in 1968 and famously employed in AR animation by Hans Rosling in recent years.

Of what was been culturally foreseen and is of relevance to the topic, I will cite Huff in his ‘prophetic’ reference to GH Wells in How to Lie with Statistics‘Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.’ I will also quote Aldous Huxley’s utopiandystopian Brave New Word (1932), in which ‘liberties and individuality’ have been lost ‘in the name of universal stability’ (Shmoop 2016).  This will be an allusion to the implication of social work with national population and fiscal policy targeting ‘illegitimate‘ children during 20th century Australia.

In the second section of the report’s body I will exemplify how governments and bureaucracies have significant authority in the relationship between the user and the computer, aiming questions of cyberculture at the legitimacy of related structures of command.  The following related research into dataviz forms an amended outline of sources extending on my first progress report and is a work in progress:

A glossary of terms will accompany an introduction to an Australian case study detailed in my first progress report. Entries will underscore the prodigious influence of digitally enabled communication, networked computation and media technologies in proliferating issues of related concern, including population trends and curvessocial entropy (see also: Galtung in 1967), exponential growth and singularity.

This case study will critique a dominant discourse and related DV by the Australian Institute of Family Studies, positing national social policy in contemporary cyberspace arenas.  An alternative DV will provide a statistical estimate of an historically marginalised group. Statistical relativity will be discussed and feature David McCandless’ take on the topic.  This work will be emancipatory and state author biases.

Conclusion

The conclusion will summarise identified limits and affordances of our technology infused realities, including: data inadequacies, the need for increased scepticism of data and new hypotheses.

Politics and Ideologies of Data Visualisation

Introduction

The following progress report on my research into the politics and ideologies of data visualisation, begins with a brief overview of my academic, scholarly and industry-relevant research and includes concise summaries of arguments to be shared in related DICG335 projects.


I am a Bachelor of Arts undergraduate student, majoring in sociology and minoring in design.  Questions of politics and ideology, broad public policy positions and related agendas overlap and concern the agendas of social policy analysts.

My undergraduate training brings the academically relevant study of neoliberalism, population geography and statistics to bear on the progress of my current project.  Relevantly, since 2011 I have conducted independent research into the politics and ideology of data visualisation in examining the social issue known as forced adoption.  I have also undertaken independent historical research into 20th century Australian state welfare policies and practices. This background knowledge informs my current research and provides the interim results of an ongoing case study.  Significantly, I have also sourced the collaborative subject blog, Cybercultures, where  Dr. Christopher Moore recently introduced me to Accelerationism, theories of systems decay, entropy and more.

Resources that have guided the development of my topic thus far are hyperlinked in the following draft outline of my research report. Each of four headings below open with a related concise summary of related arguments to be shared in Assessments 2 & 3.  These summaries have been informed by DIGC335 course material suggests and are paraphrased as block quotes below. The following research has relevance not only to the industries of social work and child welfare but education and software development.

Data visualisation, history and cyberculture

I will argue that data visualisation technology looks to the past as much as it does to the future in thinking about cyberculture and the types of technological, corporate, political, social, and legal changes that have been represented in popular culture.

Politics and ideologies of data visualisation 

I will argue that governments and bureaucracies have significant authority in the relationship between the user and the computer, aiming questions of cyberculture at the legitimacy of related structures of command and control.

Case study: Towards a statistical and contextual analysis of forced adoption (unpublished and ongoing)

This emancipatory research was undertaken to examine the statistical grounds for viewing ‘forced adoption’ as a ‘product of the times‘ (see mores of society, predicated by legislation prohibiting their taboos).

It will be employed in the current research to exemplify how the politics and ideologies of data visualisation speak to the limits and affordances of our technology infused realities.

  • Significant findings:
    • Illegitimate children are a known targeted group (para 2:14, p.34, Senate Report).
    • Statistical analysis reveals trends at odds with what social scientists regarded as indicative of social mores in 1976 (see Kraus).
    • Forced adoptions peaked between 1953-4, contrary to hegemonic discourse.
    • Historical practices and policies consistently correlated with exponential trends in annual proportions of adoptions to ex-nuptial births.
    • Evidence of a  crisis between 1965-72 and an exponential increase in welfare payments to unmarried women aged 17 and over 1971-72.
    • Underpinning ideologies, such as  euthenics and eugenics (White Australia Policy), suggested systematisation or automation of social and political policies of illegitimate child removal.
    • National and state exponential decline in adoptions circa 1971-2 may be due to social entropy.

Imaginaries and Futures

Scholarly research will be employed to argue that the politics and ideologies of data visualisation speak to a broad range of issues and concerns which have arisen as a result of the proliferation of digitally-enabled communication, networked computation and media technologies and practices.

Header image:

Infinite Unknown, 2017, retrieved March 16, <http://www.infiniteunknown.net/tag/history/&gt;