Category Archives: Futurism

Live Tweeting for Dummies

Josephine Doyle

5 weeks ago, I participated in my first ever live tweeting during a screening of Metropolis.

Since then, every Thursday afternoon I have been engaging in live tweeting during a screening of other important science fiction films with the BCM325 Future Cultures cohort. Consider this blog post a Live Tweeting for Dummies – what to do and what not to do.

Live tweeting is a new concept for me and week by week I have evidently improved through trial and error. By critiquing some of my better and worse tweets, I’m going to build a constructive plan on how I will improve my live tweets in the weeks to come.

Before the first screening I formulated the guidelines on what my live tweets should look like based on the marking rubric and the live tweeting prompts provided to us.

Metropolis (1927)

Before the Metropolis screening, I had done all…

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Exploring Possible Futures

Josephine Doyle

As discussed in Ziauddin Sardar’s 2014 ‘Welcome to postnormal times’, it is the now which brings the many possible futures into being. This was the common thread tying all of our possible futures projects together.

In the critique of and engagement with the following project pitches, I drew mostly from Eleonora Masini’s ‘Reconceptualising Futures: a Need and a Hope’. Masini’s discussion on how the visions of a desirable future are embedded in the social structures from which they emerge really stood out to me in our Future Cultures lectures.

The process for my critique was to split a screen with the pitch and an open google document with a criteria checklist. I would make notes underneath each point and then later expand on them using the notes I have from our BCM325 lectures in my notebook physically next to me. Finally I would compare their work to the…

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Investigating the Future of Women in Leadership

Josephine Doyle

Around 50 years ago, Alice Sheldon was a successful science fiction writer publishing under the male pseudonym James Tiptree Jr.. When she was discovered to be a woman, Alice lost a lot of respect from the male-dominated science fiction community (Lovell, 2016).

Interview with Julie Phillips – author of ‘James Tiptree, Jr.: The Double Life of Alice B. Sheldon’

Since then, the representation of women in leadership roles has increased. However in 2020 there were more male CEO’s named Andrew than the combined number of females leading ASX200 companies (Hill, 2020).

Premium Vector | Young business woman stands out among many business men
(Freepik, 2021)

In predicting and evaluating such future cultures, my project timeline will be adapted according to feedback from my audience. I will also be engaging with users in reddit forums such as r/womenleadership to make more informed projections. The project will evaluate the benefits of a future culture with more female leadership in up to 50…

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Future Cultures Tweets – Metropolis to Minority Report

The Space Between The Sky

Social media is often criticised for promoting a sort of ‘speak-before-you-think’ mentality. Regardless of your opinion of this statement, it is always good practice to examine the work you have produced, including social media posts. This is especially true when those social media posts (in this case, tweets), are produced in an academic or professional environment. So let’s take a look at some of the highlights of my first few weeks of live tweeting the films I have been watching for BCM 325: Future Cultures.

Week One – Metropolis (1927)

Having not tweeted during class for a long time, starting with a film I had seen before (albeit a while ago), was a nice way to begin the semester. Amongst the tweets I prepared beforehand was my personal favourite for the week, and coincidently, the tweet that performed best when looking at the analytics of that week.

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live tweeting [part 1]

パーラ・ロッティー

Metropolis Online

Week 1 – Metropolis (Lang, 1927)

For my first week of live-tweeting I decided to compile my tweets about Metropolis into a thread. Although this seemed like a great idea in theory, I felt that it didn’t quite work for the live-tweeting experience as each tweet explored a self-contained idea about the film. Threads seemed to be better suited to the stringing together of tweets that focus on the same general topic or argument. I used a literary approach for my analysis of this film, focusing on the ideas and concepts being portrayed on-screen as well as key inter-textual references.

Evidence of live-tweeting and engagement in discussion

2001-a-space-odyssey-552a7fc41108e-1

Week 2 – 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)

This week I made an effort to draw upon the subject materials in a few of my tweets. I decided not to compile my tweets in a thread so that I could improve the…

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critical self-reflection of comments (part 1)

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‘COVID-19: WHAT DOES THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE FOR SMALL BUSINESSES?’

Grace’s digital artefact topic is the future of small businesses during and after the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically how online presence will become an essential part of engaging with customers. Grace will be examining this idea through her own social media business that began this year. Her website offers a range of social media packages from general advisory to content creation and page management. She plans to offer her services free of charge or at a reduced rate to small business struggling to transition to an online business model during the outbreak. Grace’s methods when promoting these businesses will consider the government guidelines set in place regarding COVID-19.

In my comment, I commended Grace’s thorough planning and digital artefact utility. I was interested to hear more about her methodology, and what her new website packages would entail. I suggested that Grace…

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cyberculture [digital artefact pitch]

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“High tech.  Low life.”

Background Research

I’ll be researching the history and iconography of the cyberpunk genre so that I can successfully incorporate cyberpunk references and ideas into my original content. This can be achieved by familiarising myself with and analyzing popular cyberpunk literature, films, news media, academic articles, and lecture materials.

Literature; Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Philip K. Dick, 1968), The Shockwave Rider (John Brunner, 1975), Neuromancer (William Gibson, 1984)

Films; Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982), Ghost in the Shell (Mamoru Oshii, 1995) Alita: Battle Angel (Robert Rodriguez, 2019)

News Media; Bringing Cyberpunk 2077 To Life (GameSpot, 2019), Neon and corporate dystopias: why does cyberpunk refuse to move on? (The Guardian, 2018), What Is Cyberpunk? (Neon Dystopia)

Academic Articles/Books; 

Csicsery-Ronay, I., 1988. Cyberpunk and neuromanticism. Mississippi Review16(2/3), pp.266-278.

Featherstone, M. and Burrows, R. eds., 1996. 

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BCM 325 DA Pitch

My BCM325 Future Cultures DA is going to be looking into the future of camera technology in the next 10 years. I am interested to look at how new technology will assist the modern day photographer. These include bigger sensors, wireless transfer of files via the cloud, and AI inside cameras to assist you.

My DA fits the F.I.S.T principle:

Fast: I have access to information through the internet. I also have access to my camera which I am going to film it on.

Inexpensive: This will not cost me anything.

Simple: I have a plan I am going to follow as outlined in my pitch.

Tiny: This is an easy DA to achieve.

Tim Dalton – Live Tweeting Blog

Well, wow, just wow. The last few weeks have been a complete blur of work, assessments and of course, live tweeting as well. Over the course of the past few weeks I have seen a number of new movies because of BCM325, and I’m so happy that I got the chance to see them. Seeing these movies in class however, I had to critically tweet about each one, discussing the underlying themes, content, setting, and a number of other different aspects each film had to offer. In this blog post I am going to be going through and analysing my most prominent tweets from each week as well as the discussions that formed between myself and my classmates. As of every week I try to find some merchandise I can post to stay within the live tweeting guidelines and at the end of the session it would have been weird if I didn’t find or post anything relating to merchandise

IRobot

Week eight was the screening of IRobot, a futuristic action movie set in 2035. The movie itself poses questions about how we classify our own humanity compared to that of a machine, robot or A.I. The particular thread I am referencing has several different conversations about human traits, humanity and the ethics of putting feelings into machines and letting them evolve. We also talk about the different applications of futuristic robots, for example their use in modern wars.

Over the course of the session I have been trying to improve my live tweeting and just tweeting in general and I really think that this week shows that I have come a long way from when I first started the subject. In my live tweets I also like to become very critical of some of the aspects of the movie, for example I noticed that in a lot of the films we had watched in class had a very dystopian view that places technology right at the centre of all the problems facing mankind.

Robot and Frank

Week nine was the screening of Robot and Frank I believe this was the week we decided to go with a different film rather than what was stated in the outline. But I’m genuinely glad we screened robot and frank, it was a thought provoking and an unexpected movie. Before the class I had never heard of or seen Robot and frank, I was flying blind. The movie depicted an older gentleman that was beginning to show signs of dementia, as a result his son buys and gives him a robotic carer. The film challenged what people thought about technology and the usual themes of distrust running through similar films.

Instead the film showed the slow progression of frank completely distrusting the robot, to the robot becoming his friend and companion and even in the end not wanting to give him up to save his life. In the seminar we discussed the implications of advancing technology on daily life and how we think it will continue to advance. The robot in the movie was actually based off a japan design which as it so happens is an advancing project. For the most part the screening of robot and frank consisted of myself and my classmates discussing the different stance and approach the movie took to technology and how it impacts mankind.

Marjorie Prime

Week ten was the screening of a very emotional and yet another unexpected movie Marjorie Prime. The movie proposed the idea of having an advanced hologram of oneself after they have passed away. Obviously, you can already see that the topic of the movie created some really philosophical discussions around ethics, and other applications of the technology itself. The technology in the movie, raises concerns and questions about intellectual property and copy write laws. The holograms seen in Marjorie Prime are similar to a subscription, one person in the family subscribes and the rest of the family are able to become a hologram after they pass away. In an extensive thread we discussed the cultural backlash of such an advanced hologram. This week’s live tweeting was a very intense and philosophical debate about whether any of us would want to be a hologram. A critical look at my own tweeting this week leads to me to say that I had some extremely deep discussions surrounding the legal grey area this technology would fall under and specifically if it would result in the technology being made illegal and whether or not people would still use it regardless of whether it is legal or not.

blade Runner 2049

The most recent remake of Blade Runner was a fitting screening seeing as we watched the original in class a few weeks beforehand. In this screening the most commonly talked about aspect of the film was how it paid homage to its original but still paving its own way and creating its own legacy. My tweets for this screening mostly focused on the success and how the movie was made and received with modern audiences. However, there were some aspects of the film which were interesting, such as the depiction of very conservative and traditional views on women’s role in the household in the form of a hologram as well as a holograms ability to feel emotions. This movie sparked a lot of debates and conversations about the ethics of putting emotions into machines and holograms.

The Matrix

The final screening for this session was the matrix. I grew up loving this movie and was all too happy to watch it in class. This particular movie was interesting because it actually made us wonder, yet again, if it is possible for A.I to take over the planet. My contribution to this week’s live tweeting was through extensive threads and discussions about whether or not this world could become a reality. Another thread I was a part of during this seminar was discussing whether or not we would choose to be aware if we were in a simulation and what we would do if we were aware of such a situation. Overall throughout the session I definitely believe that I have become a little better at live tweeting and discussing the topics and ideas that these movies are presenting.

Tim.