Hacktivism: An online Protest

B. Jones

As technology grows so does society and they tend to move and grow with each other. Technology can induce a social change or a problem within our culture will influence a solution. With this, concerns in society can be protested against online in a similar but quieter way.

Activism in essence is the want for a change whether that change is needed politically or needed socially. Hacktivism is no different, since we are connected to each other more than ever the prospect of demonstration against a form of injustice is now just as more likely to happen at any time and people from any where on the globe can get involved. David Gunkel states that hacktivism can be described as such.

[Hacktivism] draws on the creative use of computer technology for the purposes of facilitating online protests, performing civil disobedience in cyberspace and disrupting the flow of information by…

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FPV – An Introduction

T H I N K Sam

Cyberculture can be referred to as the “response to the ubiquitous presence and use of computers and networks for aspects of contemporary social life” for example entertainment.  I like to link ‘computers’ to a broader extension of what is thought of, in a PC or laptop, but to a motherboard of controls to arduino to smart robotics. This leads into my fascination with drones. Over the last year I’ve built an expertise looking into Drones In Agriculture as well as Production, Consumption and Representation of Drones in China which allowed me to then extend the interest into FPV Drone Racing. In an attempt to break down what FPV drone enthusiasts actually do, I’m going to, from a complete beginners perspective, attempt to educate and isolate various elements so that eventually a league or club can be formed under my knowledge. 

FPV or First Person View racing can firstly be catergorised into…

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Robot vs. Man (?)

Shenae's Paige

robopocalypse

So I’ve had this book for a while, and I’ve been wanting to read it, but, I try to finish books before I start new books (it never works that way). So, I decided to pack it my bags for New Zealand over the summer (camper vanning allows a lot of down time for reading). Great book, and also great that I didn’t realise it would become so handy!

Chris Moore talked about technology, our affiliation with it and how reliant we are of it where it ironically malfunctions and acts, in a way, unreliable. This reminded of the book I read over the summer: Robopocalypse- Daniel H. Wilson

To summarise this book, it is about a scientist who created a sentient A.I. called “Archos R-14” (note the 14- there were 13 tests made prior that were destroyed when deemed unsuccessful). Archos is self-aware and highly intelligent (it knows EVERYTHING!)…

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#DIGC335: Subject Outline Recap

elysium design utopia

First week of uni is out of the way and I’m feeling thoroughly disorganised. As such, I thought whipping up a quick image to print out and stick on my wall would be appropriate. The image includes all of the assessments for this subject, which, if done properly, should lead me to pass.  The visual layout for subject outlines, though consistent, can often be hard to decipher, so this is my quick recap of what I took from the subject outline .(SHOULD BE USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH IT; I DID NOT INCLUDE EVERYTHING, JUST THE PARTS I THOUGHT WERE MOST IMPORTANT TO ME, AND HOW I APPROACH ASSIGNMENTS, SO KEEP THAT IN MIND.)

Subject Overview- digc335-05.png

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wanted: student curation of the stack

As part of this subject, students are required to research a topic or concept from the stack and blog their research, to be formally presented in the weekly seminars. Students have the option of submitting a research report or digital artifact which mediates their analysis in a critical and detailed fashion using technologies and platforms including podcast, online video, annotated image gallery or Twitter feed for example.

One student is invited to take on the curation of the stack, which will be developed further and expanded significantly over the course of the subject as a digital artifact. The curator/s will be tasked with organising and adding to the stack, filling in links and adding topics and examples. The student will present on their research and method of organising and developing the stack during the session, which will be submitted as that students’s digital artifact, with a critical reflection of 500 words explaining and documenting their approach.

living in a networked age

 

“Today’s world is full of distributed agencies and virtual potentials, rippling deconstructions and flash-point emergences, all eluding easy categorization or comprehension, at least by means of yesterday’s models. The future is not what it used to be: it is much more unpredictable, dangerous, sly and interesting.” Christopher Vitale, 2013. Networkologies: A Philosophy of Networks for a Hyperconnected Age — A Manifesto. Zero Books, UK.