Tag Archives: ethics

To Track, Or Not To Track

krisesandchrosses

Youtube Channel.PNG For my digital artefact, I created a YouTube Channel with useful information and discussions on the ethical implications on tracking humans. This channel has four videos currently but can be expanded by getting more families to discuss their own opinions on the issue. To go to the channel, click here!

Contextual Essay:

The area of study I choice to explore encompassed an aspect of cyber surveillance, geoslavery and tracking devices which has not yet been fully unraveled by society. Throughout this project I have been able to draw conclusions using my own experiences as someone who has been tracked along with using academic, pop culture, news and political sources to frame my argument involving the ethics of tracking humans.

In the context of this investigation, I cumulatively utilised primary experimental research (a discussion video with my family) and secondary research to fully engross myself in the content…

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The Ethics of Tracking your Family ~ Privacy, Surveillance and Geoslavery

krisesandchrosses

Tracking children has become an extremely contentious topic within our technologically advancing society. Norms are being broken and boarders between space and time consequently blurred. It is within our nature to be curious about the actions of others, but when does it become an unethical form of surveillance which is explored in a plethora of fictional media and channels.

tracking.gifSource.

The basis and early analysis of this topic will be unpacked further in this blog post including justification and reference to academic, news, political, social and pop culture sources. Through these studies, we can identify the nature of micro chipping humans and the ethical implications it will have on society through primary and secondary sources in conjunction with my digital artefact.

Discussion

Micro-chipping humans allows for a new way of humans to communicate with digital worlds, technology and cyberspace. However, are these benefits ethical and do they…

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Research Proposal: The Ethics of Tracking Your Family

krisesandchrosses

Every parent worries about their child. In an age of mobile phones, microchips and other advanced technology that can be utilised to pin point locations, why would parents not track their children? We are in a world where cybernetics and growing technologies supply us with the power of knowledge and information beyond our own physical, human capabilities. What then is made of the ethical implications of ‘stalking’ a child, their internet usage and willingly allowing ourselves to be programmed by this technology into thinking that this kind of behavior is normal?

shutterstock_244134181Source.

Cyber-cultures refers to “issues and concerns which have arisen as a result of the proliferation of digitally-enabled communication, networked computation and media technologies and internet practices.” (Moore, 2018). Truly within this relationship between a digital and a reality complex, we can identify that technology is making considerable bounds in becoming increasingly prevalent in human activities.

Tracking…

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User Generated Content

elysium design utopia

When brands utilise fan made, or user generated content, it becomes the advertising equivalent of citizen journalism.  It promotes the idea of participatory culture, while also adding to the narrative of the brand identity, and creating a community of collective understanding, collective intelligence, and collective passion (or brand tribes) around the brand organisation.

Bruns (2007) outlines characteristics of produsage with these 4 main points:

  • Moving away from dedicated individuals/teams, towards broader generation and distribution via participants;
  • Produsers move between the roles of leader; participant; and content user;
  • The generated content isn’t necessarily a finalised product, but something which can still develop;
  • Deliberate blind eye turned from copyright, in order to build upon existing works for further engagement.

A great example of a brand utilising user generated content to tell a targeted narrative are the hashtags UOW promotes to highlight student culture: #ExperienceUOW (1 | 2

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Ethical Issues of AI

In the popular 1993 thriller ‘Jurassic Park’, Jeff Goldblum’s  character says to Richard Attenborough’s character ” your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.” The reason I quote this, is that in this post, I intend to focus on the ethical aspect of AI. However, before I focusing on the ethical issues of relating to Artificial Intelligence, I will first attempt to differentiate ethics and morals, as they are often intertwined and confused with each other.

Separating the ethical and moral aspects of any particular topic is incredibly difficult, as ethics and morals often cross-over and are almost one of the same. Now for those of you who don’t know, the word ‘ethics’ originates from the Greek word ethos and ethikos and the word ‘morals’ is derived from the Latin word mores and moralis. In an article for The Conversation, Walker & Lovat state that “‘ethics’ leans towards decisions based upon individual character” whilst  ” ‘morals’ emphasises the widely shared communal or societal norms about right and wrong” (Walker & Lovat, 2014). So, if we follow these differences, where does that leave us, in regards to the various issues regarding Artificial Intelligence?

In regards to Artificial Intelligence, it is incredibly difficult to the ethical and moral issues, as they are often intertwined. The moral (societal) issues  are well-known to us: what happens if robots turn on us? what happens when we lose our jobs to robots? Can we feel truly safe in the presence of robots?  However, what are the ethical (individual) issues that are associated with Artificial Intelligence?

One ethics-driven issue that seems to be prevalent amongst the scientific community is that of technological singularity. Technological singularity refers to a hypothetical moment in the future when artificial intelligence surpasses the limitations of mankind and would therefore be the ones developing new technologies, rather than scientists. Why is this an ethical issue? Well, if you think about it, the scientists who are developing the technology for artificial intelligence are essentially helping create a possible future where humans are no longer useful  and are no longer in control. There are many ongoing arguments as to whether technological singularity is something we should fear or embrace. Which is why it can be considered to be an ethical issue of artificial intelligence and is arguably the most important.

Arguably the more recognized and acknowledged ethical issue, “The Frankenstein Complex” is an issue that remains significant even today and is one that can be discussed with enormous depth (on this note, this issue will be further explored in my podcast series). “The Frankenstein Complex” refers to the “almost religious notion that there are some things only God should know” (McCauley 2007, pg. 10). Although this idea may be more prominent in science-fiction than in everyday life, “The Frankenstein Complex” is still a prevalent issue amongst the scientific community and one that continues to cause debate.

frankenstein-bladerunner1

Image from: https://rhulgeopolitics.wordpress.com/2015/10/17/ships-brooms-and-the-end-of-humanity/

 

To conclude, there are many ethical issues associated with artificial intelligence, yet many of them are intertwined with the moral aspects (which I will discuss in next week’s blog post). Having said this, technological singularity and “The Frankenstein Complex” are both issues that stand out from an ethical perspective and are issues that continue to divide.

References

McCauley, L. 2007, “The Frankenstein Complex and Asimov’s three laws”, AAAI Workshop – Technical Report, pgs. 9-14

Walker, P & Lovat T 2014, ‘ You say morals, I say ethics – what’s the difference?’, The Conversation, September 18th, viewed 19th April 2016, <http://theconversation.com/you-say-morals-i-say-ethics-whats-the-difference-30913&gt;

What is the body in cyberspace?

If cyberspace is ‘a consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation,’ (Gibson, W. 1995) then cybersex is a collective, presumably consensual hallucination experienced by an indeterminate number of operators in every nation that has adequate internet infrastructure, dependent heavily on the minds of those involved.

The blurred line between real and virtual creates questions around how sex and actions in the online environment are perceived to affect ‘real’ or physical people and bodies.  For example, in simulation games like Second Life or text-based virtual realms e.g. MOOS/MUDS fertile ground is laid for understanding how humans respond to virtual, technologically mediated sexual interactions. How do we define a body in an online context as the boundaries between mind and body are eroded (Gorry 2009)?

It seems as if, increasingly, these two separately identified entities are becoming one and the same. In the case of virtual character exu 

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