Tag Archives: software

[BCM 325] Iterations, Developments & Nova: Making my DA Beta!

Hey there,

Below is a video outlining the progression of my Digital Artefact over the past couple of weeks!

https://videopress.com/v/FLrbEIIi

As you can see, my Digital Artefact has undergone a number of significant alterations which I feel will help to increase the utility of my final video essay is a source of information for avid science-fiction academics, enthusiasts and even those who may simply be interested in the use of nova to speculate about the future in the next 5, 10, 50 years or beyond. While my DA is aimed at a hugely active audience, it should be noted that the audience itself is relatively niche and consumes content that is unique and highly specialised.

Overall, I happy with the trajectory of my DA and I feel that I have successfully incorporated feedback into the iteration process. It is my goal to continue researching and publish a draft ‘script’ of my video essay on my blog in the near future to permit further feedback prior to uploading the final version to Youtube.

I am excited to explore the representation of nova and other similar concepts to begin to understand their value in engaging with the future in the upcoming weeks!

Until then,

-Josh

SQUAAD

Hey there!

Below is a video outlining the progression of my Digital Artefact over the past couple of weeks!

As you can see, my Digital Artefact has undergone a number of significant alterations which I feel will help to increase the utility of my final video essay is a source of information for avid science-fiction academics, enthusiasts and even those who may simply be interested in the use of nova to speculate about the future in the next 5, 10, 50 years or beyond. While my DA is aimed at a hugely active audience, it should be noted that the audience itself is relatively niche and consumes content that is unique and highly specialised.

Overall, I happy with the trajectory of my DA and I feel that I have successfully incorporated feedback into the iteration process. It is my goal to continue researching and publish a draft ‘script’ of my…

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[BCM 325] Novums Pitch! Ta DA! — SQUAAD

https://videopress.com/embed/XXgjbdc9?hd=0&autoPlay=0&permalink=0&loop=0

Heyya! *Waves with hand open like Dr. Spock* Ever since I attended the first BCM 325 Seminar of the Autumn session, the concept of a ‘novum’ has intrigued me. Not suprisingly, a search through instagram reveals that there is indeed a large audience who also enjoy exploring various elements within the sci-fi and speculative genre […]

via [BCM 325] Novums Pitch! Ta DA! — SQUAAD

Research Proposal: The Ethics of Tracking Your Family

krisesandchrosses

Every parent worries about their child. In an age of mobile phones, microchips and other advanced technology that can be utilised to pin point locations, why would parents not track their children? We are in a world where cybernetics and growing technologies supply us with the power of knowledge and information beyond our own physical, human capabilities. What then is made of the ethical implications of ‘stalking’ a child, their internet usage and willingly allowing ourselves to be programmed by this technology into thinking that this kind of behavior is normal?

shutterstock_244134181Source.

Cyber-cultures refers to “issues and concerns which have arisen as a result of the proliferation of digitally-enabled communication, networked computation and media technologies and internet practices.” (Moore, 2018). Truly within this relationship between a digital and a reality complex, we can identify that technology is making considerable bounds in becoming increasingly prevalent in human activities.

Tracking…

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How is cyberculture creating permissive spaces for cybersex?

What if the only time in your 18 year marriage that you have felt sexually ‘alive’ was when you were online exploring your kinks with virtual strangers who made you love your body and mind?

This was the case for the woman in the Savage Love Letter column published on March 22 2016, and a trend in some of the literature that I have read so far: unfulfilled physical sex lives suddenly come alive in permissive virtual spaces. Cultural history and mass media writer Chris Barniuk suggests that this kind of revelatory and explorative behaviour is a typical characteristic of our collective first forays into cyberspace (2013). Based on the phone-phreaking culture of the early hackers, Baraniuk shows that online and networked spaces have always been ripe for self-exploration, discovery of niche interests and low barriers to participation.

Other evidence points to the virtual space as a uniquely permissive and explorative environment due to the very nature of the technical environment e.g. software, on which spaces are built. Iris Bull describes the game Minecraft as a medium which ‘grants players an impressive amount of permission to do as they like with the program’ (p. 19, 2014); reflective of this medium are alternate virtual environments like MMORPGS (Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Games) e.g. Second Life and social networks e.g. FetLife. The flexibility and inherent unpredictability of these online spaces encourages critical engagement with our self and societally imposed sexual restrictions.

These spaces also encourage a departure from gender and sexuality norms through the lack of emphasis on the relationship between gender and power in our physical and societal lives (Bull 2014). This departure is evidenced in the success of Tumblr blogs in providing young women with alternative spaces in which they are free to enjoy and disseminate pornographic material and feel like they are not being judged for their desires, a problem in part born from the failure of platforms like Facebook and Instagram to accept the female body in its sexual and maternal visual form (Gray 2016). The success of similar permissive spaces such as online forums like Reddit (Clark-Flory 2013), and other blogging sites and web spaces (Wheaton 2016) is directly reflected in the cyber-cultural value of community, communication and sharing (Schrock 2014).

This particular cyber-cultural value seems to be the key to the rest of my research in understanding how the virtual experience transforms our conceptualisation of sex, sexuality and sexual interaction.